Soil orders

Anthropic Soils [A]

New Zealands largest single areas of Anthropic Soils were formed by gold dredging in Central Otago and Westland.

Anthropic Soils are constructed by, or drastically disturbed, by people. They include soil materials formed by stripping of the natural soil, deposition of refuse or spoil, or by severe soil mixing. The original character of the soil and the normal soil properties are lost.

Anthropic man-made soil at a construction site, Albany.
Anthropic man-made soil at a construction site, Albany.
Anthropic man-made soil at a construction site, Waitakere.
Anthropic man-made soil at a construction site, Waitakere.
Anthropic man-made soil at a mine site.
Anthropic man-made soil at a mine site.

Occurrence

Anthropic Soils are most extensive in urban areas and areas that have been mined. They cover < 1% of New Zealand.

View map View map of Anthropic soils.

 

Physical properties

The relationships between Anthropic soils and landforms do not have the orderliness of natural soils. Soil properties depend on both the nature of the manufactured or natural materials, and the nature of the soil manipulation. Land surfaces are artificial and drainage has often been changed significantly from the original state.

Chemical properties

(cf Physical Properties)

Biological properties

(cf Physical Properties)

Soil groups

Soil orders are divided into soil groups based on variation in factors such as drainage status, parent material, chemical and physical properties

[AT] Truncated Anthropic

Most of the pre-existing soil profile has been removed

[AR] Refuse Anthropic

Waste material that contains significant organic material

[AM] Mixed Anthropic

Drastic disturbance and loss of original character by mixing

[AF] Fill Anthropic

Waste material dominated by inorganic material